Advice is a stranger; if he’s welcome he stays for the night; if not, he leaves the same day

Malagasy Proverb

When starting your South Africa or Kruger National Park safari adventure it can be daunting! Shaun has put a list of questions and answers together for you to make your life easier

How do I pay you safely?

We accept all major credit cards and can-do secure EFT payments. These go through a third-party company for peace of mind. All payments will be in your own currency

Visa info?

Most countries are welcome to visit Mama Africa to enjoy our love for life. Please check with a local travel authority if you are not sure or contact us and we will assist you. A few things to note that are pertinent for all the countries we run safaris in:
 
– Visas are only valid for 90 days
 
– You need at least 6 months until your passport expires when you start travelling
 
– From 1 June 2015, all minors under the age of 18 travelling in and out of South Africa must hold, besides their passport, an unabridged birth certificate with details of both parents. If the child is travelling with only one parent, an affidavit with the absent parent’s consent is required. If the child is travelling with another adult and without both parents, an affidavit with consent of both parents must be produced. An unaccompanied minor, besides holding an affidavit and birth certificate, must provide the requisite information of the local South African host. In September 2018 the Cabinet announced that they intend on scrapping this controversial rule for children travelling, so please double check this before travelling with your local travel authority

Travel?

All our safaris are guided and hosted. Travel arrangements will always be arranged by your guide. You will always receive a full, interactive itinerary before each safari. If you need more info, Shaun is always at hand to assist

What to pack for a safari?

Here is a list of what to bring on your safari…

• Hats, sunblock, insect repellent and sunglasses
• Swimming costume as the lodges have pools
• Cool, long clothes for the evenings around the fire
• Something warm (layers) for the game drive from May to September
• Camera and binoculars
• Flashlight
• Mammal and bird books
• Any electrical charges you may need (make sure they are compatible with African plug points). We run on 220 volts
• Any medication you need

Health and safety?

In Africa, things change constantly… As such, so do rules and regulations. Make sure you ask your doctor about vaccinations before coming to southern Africa
We have written a comprehensive blog post regarding malaria which you can click on here, Malaria South Africa and Kruger National Park
There are numerous snake species found in southern Africa, only 7 of which are regarded as deadly. You may be lucky enough to see them living their daily lives out in the bush… Please be aware though that these creatures are very scared of humans and if left alone, pose very little threat to you. If ever one gets too close for comfort, never lash out, that is what we are here for
Ticks are often seen in the summer months hanging off grass stems looking for a tasty animal to latch onto. We do encounter them on walks occasionally and suggest you bring insect repellent and wear long pants and boots on our walks

Tipping info?

Tipping is a general practice in Africa. Here is some information on tipping:

  • In restaurants, 10% to 15% is the accepted tipping standard on the bill amount
  • Petrol attendants at gas stations – from R5 up
  • Porters at airports – between R5 and R10 per luggage
  • Hotel porters – between R10 to R20 per porter service
  • Rangers, trackers and chefs – between R200 to R300 or more per day each
  • Site guides (e.g. a guide at an activity) – R100 per person
  • Guides – anything between 5-10% of the safari cost or more if you feel that s/he was exceptional

Please be aware that this is a guideline and you should never feel obliged to tip anyone. It is your discretion and thoughts on the service you have received that should govern your tips

Wi-Fi and connectivity?

Most of the lodges that we stay at have got Wi-Fi access, some may be slower than others (hey, it is the bush now)

If you would like to use a mobile phone while on safari then we would suggest using a local sim card. They are very cheap, and airtime and data is inexpensive. Your guide can take you to a local shop to buy one, but bear in mind:

  • Make sure you know the size of the sim card your phone uses
  • Make sure you have unlocked your phone as some phones do not allow other sim cards to be loaded

Food and drink?

Food and drink play a huge role on a safari. Our chefs often find the lasting blend between old-world tradition and modern culinary influence. The sense of wilderness isn’t interrupted as you dine beneath the stars, a fire crackling and nocturnal animals calling and moving around. Menus are unique, blending local ingredients. Sometimes those you won’t find served anywhere else in the world. Each lodge will also have a well-stocked bar, or your guide will assist you to buy our own drinks. South Africans are well known for their hospitality, you are in good hands

Hygiene and comfort?

Sometimes it’s hard to picture. You’re heading deep into the bush, a hundred miles from a tarred road or town. There’s going to be no running water. You’re going to be far from a borehole and can’t imagine how you have a wash. And a shower? In such remote wilderness? Rest assured that each lodge has clean water and varied amenities. All will have a hot shower / bath and a clean, flushing toilet with all the comforts of home. Moriti have you covered, unless you enjoy wallowing in the mud with the buffalo, that is